Matt’s Classes and Notes

These are for the classes I have taught at UC Davis since Spring Quarter 1997. Handouts and such for earlier classes are not available on the Web.

By Class

By Quarter

Spring 2017 ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Fall 2016 ECS 153, Computer Security
Spring 2016 ECS 153, Computer Security
ECS 289M, Introduction to Research in Computer and Information Security
Winter 2016 ECS 235A, Computer and Information Security
ECS 289M, Introduction to Research in Computer and Information Security
Fall 2015 ECS 30, Programming and Problem Solving
Spring 2015 ECS 153, Computer Security
ECS 289M, Introduction to Research in Computer and Information Security
Winter 2015 ECS 289M, Introduction to Research in Computer and Information Security
Fall 2014 ECS 235A, Computer and Information Security
Spring 2014 ECS 10, Basic Concepts of Computing
Winter 2014 ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Fall 2013 ECS 155, Computer Security for Non-Majors
Spring 2013 ECS 153, Computer Security
ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Fall 2012 ECS 10, Basic Concepts of Computing
Winter 2012 ECS 10, Basic Concepts of Computing
ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Fall 2011 ECS 293A, Research in Computer Science
Spring 2011 ECS 153, Computer Security
ECS 155, Computer Security for Non-Majors
Winter 2011 ECS 15, Introduction to Computers
ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Spring 2009 ECS 10, Basic Concepts of Computing
Winter 2009 ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Fall 2008 ECS 150, Operating Systems
Spring 2008 ECS 150, Operating Systems
FRS 001-010, E-Voting and Elections
Winter 2008 ECS 153, Computer Security
ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Spring 2007 ECS 15, Introduction to Computers
Winter 2007 ECS 235B, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Fall 2006 ECS 153, Computer Security
Spring 2006 ECS 289M, Foundations of Computer and Information Security
Winter 2006 ECS 153, Computer Security
Fall 2005 ECS 155, Computer Security for Non-Majors
Spring 2005 ECS 153, Computer Security
ECS 235, Computer and Information Security
Spring 2004 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
ECS 235, Computer and Information Security
Winter 2004 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Fall 2003 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Spring 2003 ECS 235, Computer and Information Security
Winter 2003 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Spring 2002 ECS 30, Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving
ECS 289M, Vulnerabilities and Policy Models
Winter 2002 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Spring 2001 ECS 253, Cryptography and Data Security
Winter 2001 ECS 251, Operating Systems Models
Fall 2000 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Spring 2000 ECS 253, Cryptography and Data Security
Winter 2000 ECS 150, Operating Systems ECS 251, Operating Systems Models
Fall 1999 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Spring 1999 ECS 150, Operating Systems
Winter 1999 ECS 253, Cryptography and Data Security
Fall 1998 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Winter 1998 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security
Fall 1997 ECS 40, Introduction to Software Development
Spring 1997 ECS 253, Cryptography and Data Security
Winter 1997 ECS 153, Introduction to Computer Security

If the colleges were better, if they really had it, you would need to get the police at the gates to keep order in the inrushing multitude. See in college how we thwart the natural love of learning by leaving the natural method of teaching what each wishes to learn, and insisting that you shall learn what you have no taste or capacity for. The college, which should be a place of delightful labor, is made odious and unhealthy, and the young men are tempted to frivolous amusements to rally their jaded spirits. I would have the studies elective. Scholarship is to be created not by compulsion, but by awakening a pure interest in knowledge. The wise instructor accomplishes this by opening to his pupils precisely the attractions the study has for himself. The marking is a system for schools, not for the college; for boys, not for men; and it is an ungracious work to put on a professor. — Ralph Waldo Emerson

Matt Bishop
Dept. of Computer Science, UC Davis
Send electronic mail to username bishop at domain name cs.ucdavis.edu
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